Spiritual Genetics

I’ve discussed once before where the Pagan-Heathen element of a person comes from, nature or nurture or a combination. This time I am more concerned with whether the spiritual tendencies or associations of a particular people can be transferred through genetics. Yes, I’m treating science and ‘everything else’ as readily mixable substances.

A predominant part of by blood heritage comes from Europe, Ireland and Wales. That part of the world. Culturally speaking there are distinct elements to the spiritual expression of those particular culture groups. Oral traditions, a focus on songs as a means of magical influence, etc. The other part of my blood heritage is native/Indigenous Australian. This culture group also shares a focus on oral tradition, songs as a magical medium and various other things that I wont go into. THe bottom line is that the definite parts of my blood that have gone into making Me share certain elements of spiritual expression.

However, there are some areas in which they are some what different.

While the European part have a heritage that is closely linked to nature, gods and goddesses and spirits that represent certain elements of the natural world and the lifestyle of the past, the native Australian part has a heritage which is very much concerned with being a part of the land. Not just aware of the natural world and caring for it, but being a part of it and the Dreaming (the… Otherworld equivalent for native Australians).

Is it possible that the combination of these elements can come together to create a spiritual expression in me that is neither wholly one or the other, but has elements of both, like you would see in the child of two very (genetically) different people?

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3 thoughts on “Spiritual Genetics

  1. It’s hard to view genetics as a cause of spirituality. Look at newer religions; while the ancient Greeks and Norse had their own gods, the Christian and Muslim gods are far more common now. So how can you explain someone with Irish blood as being Celtic-ly inclined, with their country being very Catholic (and Protestant)? I think that’s my main issue with the theory of genetic predisposition. You either ignore the ancient roots, or you ignore the current culture of the ethnicity in your blood.

    1. You raise a very good point. How can I explain someone with Irish bloody being Celtic-ly inclined given that Ireland is very Christo-centric? It really depends on whether you/I believe that the older elements of a person’s heritage take precedent over what is essentially a transplanted religion. Or put another way, it comes down to how close to ‘pure’ you want to consider things. You could say that because Christianity is not the native faith of Ireland or any of the modern Celtic races, it doesn’t have any real bearing on a persons ‘spiritual genetics’. But that then raises the different issue of how much actually counts as you having the blood of a particular race? One generation back? Two? Three? More? This is one of those subjects that can either be quite interesting for people to discuss or give rise to a phenomenal amount of vitriol; I raise it because however small, a sentiment exists that says a person cannot practice say, Brujeria, if one is not from a Hispanic family or background. I find that it is of particular, but subtle, importance to someone like myself who really doesn’t have a particular heritage that can be claimed with certainty. It’s an unfortunate byproduct of being what amounts to a mongrel, genetically speaking.

      1. Yep, being a mutt can have its downsides. You could get really technical and say that all humans, regardless of country origins, were once-upon-a-time animists… if you went back far enough.

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